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Q

Does the Synchronic Wastegate use a two-piece valve?

A

The Synchronic wastegates have never used a two-piece valve.  Many manufacturers claim to use exotic materials in their valves and use 2 piece designs to minimize cost.  Synchronic wastegates use a one-piece forged valve made from our own specification of stainless steel with materials verified using a mass spectrometer.  Two-piece friction, or vibration welded valves have a tendency to separate right at the junction of the valve stem and head under extreme temperatures or forces.  

Early revisions of the Synchronic wastegate utilized a bare stainless steel finish.  The latest revisions have a Nitrided surface coating to minimize the adhesion of particulates and chemical deposition on the valve stem.  

Over the years, the valves in the Synchronic wastegates have been very durable and we have not seen a single valve bend or melt under operation.

Q

How do I fix oscillation with the Synchronic Wastegate when controlling with a solenoid?

A

The Synchronic WG is quite responsive to computer control.  However, depending on the solenoid you use, it may flow far more than the Synchronic Wastegate really needs in order to be efffective.  The response characteristic will also depend heavily on the type of solenoid you decide to use.  Industrial automation valves such as the MAC valve tend to show more "noise" than the automotive OEM variety such as the Pierburgh 3-ports solenoids.

All you need to do when experiencing this oscillation is to put a restrictor on the atmospheric port of the solenoid. 

Using a MAC valve as an example, you will connect Port 2 to your wastegate, Port 3 to your boost source and Port 1 to atmosphere.  You will need to use a restrictor on Port 1 similar to a nitrous jet.

Q

How do I set up the Synchronic Wastegate?

A

If you are ever in doubt with regards to setting up your Synchronic Wastegate, call Synapse Engineering.

(858) 457-1700

Some basic information that anyone that uses Synchronic Wastegate needs to understand:



1)  You ALWAYS need a boost source on either Port C, Port D or both if you ever expect your wastegate to open.

2)  Port C and Port D are the same as the bottom port of a conventional wastegate.  These 2 ports open the wastegate.

3)  Port A & Port B both behave like the top port on a conventional wastegate.  These 2 ports keep the wastegate shut.

4)  Always work with an experienced professional tuner when tuning boost levels.  Preferably with a load-based dyno that can hold a fixed RPM.  So that you can measure baseline boost levels at specific RPMs, in order to verify if you are going over your target.

5)  The absolute bottom-line when tuning for boost pressures, is to watch the boost gauge.  The operator of the vehicle needs to be paying close attention so that they can immediately lift off the throttle should boost begin to exceed reasonable levels for your individual application.

Q

How do I use a boost controller with the Synchronic Wastegate?

A

When using a solenoid to control boost, there should be no need to use the top ports of the wastegate.  This is only necessary if you are trying to achieve very high (30+ psi of boost pressure and/or are faced with very high backpressures)

The diagram below is based on the use of a standard 3-way, 2 position MAC valve.  This is the same valve used by AEM.

Solenoid Basics:
Port 1 - Control output port
Port 2 - Normally closed inlet port at rest (Cannot blow through to Port 1 when solenoid isn't energized/0% duty cycle)
Port 3 - Normally open port at rest (You can blow through to Port 1 when solenoid isn't energized/0% duty cycle)

Most of you that are familiar with boost control setups, will realize that this is setup as an interrupt manual boost controller.  This means that the pressure source is being regulated to the wastegate to "trick" it into thinking that the system is making less boost pressure than it actually is. 

Using a bleed-type manual boost controller that is tee'd into the boost line to the WG will not be effective with the Synchronic wastegate no matter how much air pressure you bleed away from the WG.  The Synchronic WG is far too responsive to pressure signals to be fooled by a simple drop in mass volume in the control signal.  This is why most OEM systems have to use a restrictor orifice in order to make a bleed work on an OEM car.  Besides, the compressor of a turbo can keep producing flow to compensate for the bleed.  You may be able to use a bleeder type boost controller that has a ball&spring gate. 

Q

How do I use the various ports on the Synchronic Wastegate?

A

Before beginning with making wastegate adjustments with your Synchronic WG, always keep the following basic pieces of information at the top of your mind:

1)  You always have to have a boost-gauge to measure your level of indicated operating boost pressure.  
2)  The operator of the vehicle during testing is responsible for watching the indicated boost level and having the presence of mind to be able to lift off the throttle should boost target boost levels be exceeded.  
3)  Like a legacy wastegate with a top and bottom port, ports C&D are like the bottom port which opens the valve in Synchronic wastegate.
4)  Ports A&B are the ports that keep the valve in Synchronic wastegate closed.
5)  You should always have a qualified tuner, preferrably in a controlled environment such as load-based dyno, supervising your adjustments.

The guidelines above should be followed anytime you are making adjustments to turbocharger boost levels.  This is especially true with manual and electronic boost controllers.  This will also apply with any wastegate, not just Synchronic.

I.  As stated in the tuning manual.  Synchronic WG has 6 different built-in boost settings without using a boost controller.  This doesn't mean that you shouldn't use a boost controller.  It just means that you can vary your boost levels without having to use one.  Before moving forward with the advanced wastegating strategies in Part 2 and 3 you should give these different levels a try in order to familiarize yourself with the various boost characteristics.  Experienced tuners will quickly learn how to achieve their desired boost response curve.

  In order of increasing boost levels are the following port combinations:

    1)  Port C+D
    2)  Port C+D+A
    3)  Port C
    4)  Port C+A
    5)  Port D
    6)  Port D+A
 
  Your indicated boost level will vary, based on variables such as the turbocharger exhaust A/R ratio and wheel diameter and   
profile.  But the most important variable that will determine your indicated boost level will be the relationship between intake manifold pressure and exhaust manifold pressure.  At any given time, there are usually 2 pressures that open a wastegate.  Pressure at the actuator to a port that opens the valve and the exhaust pressure at the valve's face on the exhaust manifold side.  
 

Q

I can't make the desired boost pressure, and I have tried both springs that came in the box.

A

You need a stiffer spring than what comes standard with the wastegate's retail package.  Your level of backpressure is such that it is overcoming the spring and needs more spring force in order to keep it shut.

A stiffer preload spring will apply more spring pressure and help keep the gate shut.

They can be ordered here:

Spring D, 60 lb preload

http://synapseengineering.pinnaclecart.com/products/Spring_D_Preload_Spring_60lbs_Preload-72-1.html

Spring E, 90 lb preload

http://synapseengineering.pinnaclecart.com/products/Spring_E_Preload_Spring_90lbs_Preload-73-1.html

Spring F, 120 lb preload

http://synapseengineering.pinnaclecart.com/products/Spring_F_Preload_Spring_120lbs_Preload-74-1.html

Q

I'm trying to take apart the wastegate, but the valve is not separating from the piston.

A

After taking off the top cover with a 4mm Allen key, the valve should be able to move up and down freely while still attached to the piston.

[Picture of radial set screws]

Push the valve all the way up, and 3 radial holes should be visible. Inside each of these holes are 2 set screws. One to actually hold the valve to the piston mechanism, and one to ensure that the first set of screws do not back out. After removing all 6 set screws, the piston mechanism and valve should come apart easily, and allow access to the 3 machine screws holding the bottom of the actuator housing to the valve housing. 

The aluminum around the machine screws should be punched as to prevent the screws from backing themselves out. 

[Picture of punched machine screws]


Author: Chad
Q

I’m experiencing boost creep with my Synchronic wastegate, how do I fix it?

A

 

There are several factors that produce boost creep.  The leading cause of boost creep is fabrication-based and determined by the installed location of the wastegate.  This applies to any wastegate.  However, there are some control signal issues that can be checked prior to changing location of the wastegate.  Please check these steps in the following order:

  • Are you using a solenoid to control the wastegate?
    • If yes, then make sure that there are no leaks in any of those lines
    • Insure that your pressure signal for the solenoid is sourced at the compressor discharge.  NEVER source this signal from the intake manifold vacuum/boost source.  You need to use a boost-only, no vacuum, positive pressure only, signal. 
    • If your boost-only signal is sourced from a charge or intercooler pipe, insure that there are no leaks in coupling as this will reduce the effectiveness of the pressure signal
    • We advise you not to use excessive lengths of signal line.  The location of your signal source is much more important than the length of line from the solenoid to the wastegate.
  • If your wastegate is connected directly to a boost-only source for control verify the following
    • Insure that your pressure signal is sourced at the compressor discharge.  NEVER source this signal from the intake manifold vacuum/boost source.  You need to use a boost-only, no vacuum, positive pressure only, signal.  Make your best attempt to source the signal as close to the compressor discharge as possible.  You always want your control signal as close to the source (turbocharger) of the signal as possible to reduce the delay in the effectiveness of your actuator (wastegate) to control your source (turbocharger)
    • If your boost-only signal is sourced from a charge or intercooler pipe, insure that there are no leaks in couplers as this will reduce the effectiveness of the pressure signal
    • We advise you not to use excessive lengths of signal line.  The location of your signal source is much more important than the length of line from the source to the wastegate.
Q

What are the dimensions of the Synchronic 40mm WG?

A

 

The dimensions of the Synchronic 40mm WG can be seen in the attached drawing.

Inches are represented in brackets, milimeters are represented below that.  Each measurement is accurate to +- 1 of the last digit.


Download PDF Datasheet: 40mm WG Packaging.pdf (50.67 KB)
Please note you will need the free Adobe Reader™ to view this file.
Q

What are the dimensions of the Synchronic 50mm WG?

A

 

The dimensions of the Synchronic 50mm WG can be seen in the attached drawing.

Inches are represented in brackets, milimeters are represented below that.  Each measurement is accurate to +- 1 of the last digit.


Download PDF Datasheet: 50mm WG Packaging.pdf (26.5 KB)
Please note you will need the free Adobe Reader™ to view this file.
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